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On the bright, breezy afternoon of March 2 the colors were run up in an official flag-raising ceremony on the same staff from which the Japs had dragged them down three years before. It was a picturesque spectacle. (Above) The rooftops and balconies of the battered buildings all around the parade ground, were crowded with soldiers who had taken part in the combat and who were enjoying the heroic occasion. A particular friend of mine, named Pete, had insisted that we scramble to our vantage point on the top of the old barracks, from which we had so often in the last eventful days looked out on the progress of the various patrols and ships and planes.  A wry fellow was this Pete, deeply emotional at heart, but always masking his feelings with a salty curtness. Even on occasions such as this he was not one to let sentiment run away with him. After the Stars and Stripes had rolled out in full glory from the peak of the staff, I felt my nerves tingling,  but beside me Pete dropped his salute and commented, "Well that ends the story of Corregidor, the true story. From now on it's a legend and belongs to the scenario writers. They'll make comic-strip heroes out of the real men who fought here. I'm glad we saw our part. They can have theirs."

(Note the Piper L-4 aircraft which were able to use the parade ground, now cleared, as a landing field.)

2010 William T. Calhoun & 503d PRCT Heritage Bn