This feature is a permanent extract of the best REDISCOVERING CORREGIDOR posts from our Bulletin Board

 

FIELD NOTES

 


MALINTA TUNNEL PART 1

MALINTA TUNNEL PART II

MISCELLANEOUS TRAVELS ON CORREGIDOR - 1

VARIOUS SCENES - PART 1

THEN AND NOW

ENGINEER RAVINE

THEN AND NOW

BATTERY GEARY AIR RAID SHELTER PART 1

BATTERY GEARY VINTAGE IMAGES PART 2

BATTERY GEARY

 TODAY - PART 3

GOAL-POST RIDGE

BATTERY RJ-43

NAVY RADIO INTERCEPT TUNNEL ,  FOTS2/110423

TAILSIDE CEMETERIES, TOMBSTONES, FOTS2/110316

MALINTA HILL, COMPARISON 1977 SLIDES, FOTS2/090820

MALINTA HILL, GUN POSITION LOCATED,  FOTS2/110320

MIDDLESIDE BARRACKS, EXT & INTERIOR,  FOTS2/101210

NORTH OF KINDLEY FIELD, WALKING WEST,  FOTS2/101210

TAILSIDE, LT. LAWRENCE'S GUN POSITION, FOTS2/110205

OFFICER'S COUNTRY, GOLF CLUB & POOL, FOTS2/100329

ROCK POINT, SEARCHLIGHT NO. 2, FOTS2/091205

SEARCHLIGHT  NO. 2, DAMAGE BY LANDSLIDE  FOTS2/100415

GUN GROUP COMMAND POST, NO. 1, INTERIOR, FOTS2/090823

REVISITING BUNKER'S C-1 TUNNEL, FOTS/100427

DID BATTERY GRUBBS JUMP THEIR TRUNNIONS, TF/100120

INFANTRY TRENCH LINES ON TAILSIDE, FOTS2/090408

MALINTA GASOLINE STORAGE LATERALS FOTS2/090517

BATTERY WAY, PRE-WAR & SPECS, FOTS2/100523-1

BATTERY WAY, INTERIORS, PIT & STATIONS,  FOTS2/100523-2

JAPANESE TWIN 25mm AA GUN, IDENTIFICATION, FOTS2/100121

MARIVELES TUNNEL NO. 1, WELTEKE 110103

BATTERY SUNSET
 FOTS2/110514

 

 

 

 

 

FIELD NOTE:

 

PLACE: CORREGIDOR DATE:

10 DECEMBER 2010

LOCALE: MIDDLESIDE BARRACKS
OBSERVATION: FOTS PHOTO TOUR
BY: JOHN MOFFITT
 

REF: FOTS2/101210

   
   

Built in 1915, Middleside Barracks was a modern structure for its day. I have never seen any sort of blueprints for the barracks so I cannot label any locations or room functions. Toilets and showers are obvious. Only one room had any indication as to who was quartered there. 

Today the state of the barracks ranges from reasonably intact to just rubble as you will see in the following photos. The top floor is quite dangerous in places and you certainly have to exercise caution there. The day tour buses stop at the roadside but no one is allowed near the buildings. I would say a project about three years ago to reinforce fragile areas has been quite successful. Even a strong typhoon a few months ago did no damage that I am aware of.

In the rainy season the buildings look dark grey with moss in some areas. In the dry season they look light grey/yellowish. Some photos are from past trips, however most were taken just last week.

 

Middleside Barracks pre-war.

1945 view of Middleside. The two barracks are in the foreground and the large building middle left was the Army Service Club (YMCA). 

1962 aerial view of the barracks. (courtesy chadhill).

2007 aerial view of the barracks

2007 aerial view of the west side barracks

2007 aerial view of the east side barracks

2007 wide view. Near top right is James Ravine on the north coast. Top left is the Fort Mills Hospital.

2006 pre clean-up and reinforcement view.

2006 pre clean-up and reinforcement view.

2006 pre clean-up and reinforcement view.

2010 photo taken from beside the barracks of the road going up to Topside.

You can see some of the metal reinforcement here.

The road to Topside passes by the top of the steps. At the bottom of the steps was a walkway over to the third floor of the barracks.





























































The faded lettering says “Battery D 91st CA (PS)”








Look at this damaged wall. This must be an example of the “prefabricated and modular metal lathe reinforcements” construction method used for these buildings. 




Close-up view of a prefab wall.








































Roof top bomb hole. Note the recent metal reinforcement in some of these photos. When you look at the work up close you can see that they did a great job.



































Here is something I expect most people do not know about. As you wander around the barracks you may notice metal plates/covers on the floor.




One of the metal covers that can be seen in several locations. Lift the cover and have a look.




Yep, that’s one of several tunnel entrances under these barracks. 

I have heard of three possible builders of the tunnels. US Marines, treasure hunters and scrappers. I have no idea which or if any of those would be correct. Some tunnels are crude rat holes just under the floor where you crawl along on your hands and knees. Others are deeper tunnels including laterals with squared corners. In these, you can stand up. Obviously they are not the work of someone in a hurry.

When you consider history, the Marines theory does not seem logical to me. They arrived on Corregidor on December 26th,1941 and moved into the Middleside Barracks. Soldiers living there told the Marines that the building was bombproof so why would they dig any tunnels. Plus, only three days later on the first day of Japanese bombing, December 29th, the building was virtually destroyed. The Marines moved to their field positions the same day. (http://www.fourthmarinesband.com/shanghai.htm)

In my opinion treasure hunters and scrappers would never dig anything so elaborate. I have never read of these tunnels in historical books. 

Does anyone know anything about them?




The roof of this tunnel is the bottom of the building’s concrete floor.








Looking towards one of the entrances that has been chipped through the concrete floor above the tunnel.




Looking up at another covered entrance. 












A typical cover.




Early morning view of Middleside Barracks.




Final view of the Middleside Barracks.
 

Read more:http://corregidor.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=threads&action=display&thread=858#ixzz1H7raptsM