the 1 july 2003 amendments - COMMENTARY

 

 

 

Class 1 - Pre-percussion Handgun:

A pre-percussion handgun includes all antique firearms less than 75 cm in length that is a muzzle loading firearm activated by a fuse, matchlock, wheel lock, snaphaunce, flintlock or miquelet lock.

 

 

All pre-percussion handguns do not require licensing or registration.

 

 

 

 

 

 

THE SNAPHAUNCE

 

 

WLB are not conceding much here - consider the period in which these mechanisms originated

 

 

Class 2 - Antique Handgun:

An antique handgun includes all firearms, manufactured before 1 January 1901, less than 75 cm in length, other than a pre-percussion handgun that is one of the following:

  • a muzzle loading firearm,

  • a cap and ball firearm,

  • an approved firearm where ammunition is not commercially available.

 

All antique handguns must be registered. Whilst any person in possession is not required to be licensed - their firearms may be registered to an existing collectors licence. It is an offence to be in possession of an unregistered Antique Handgun.

 

 

 

Class 3 - Collectable Handgun:

A collectable handgun includes all firearms less than 75 cm in length, manufactured on or after 1 January 1901 but on or before 31 December 1946, that is of obvious and significant commemorative,historic, thematic or investment value.

 

All collectable handguns are required to be registered to a licence. Any person in possession is required to hold a collector's licence. Persons currently holding temporarily inoperable collectable handguns under a collectors licence are required to become members of an approved historical society by 31 December 2003.

 

 

Class 4 - Modern Collectable Handgun:

A modern collectable handgun means a category H weapon manufactured on or after 1 January 1947 that is of obvious and significant commemorative, historic, thematic or investment value.

All modern collectable handguns are required to be registered. Any person in possession is required to hold a collector's licence, endorsed with a condition permitting the possession of post 1946 handguns. To obtain this licence condition you must identify your prolonged and genuine interest in the study, preservation or collection of firearms. Persons currently holding temporarily inoperable modern collectable handguns under a collector's licence are required to become members of an approved historical society by 31 December 2003.

 

 

Licensing and Registration Procedures

 

Antique Handguns:

 

Persons holding antique handguns are now required to give written notice to the Weapons Licensing Branch on or before 31 December 2003 with the following information:

 

1. the person's name and address;

2. the type, make, calibre, action, magazine capacity and any serial number of the antique handgun;

3. the place where the handgun is generally kept;

4. the approximate year of manufacture;

 

Collectable and Modern Collectable Handguns:

 

Persons holding collectable and modem collectable handguns also need to provide written notice to the Weapons Licensing Branch on or before 31 December 2003 with the following information for each handgun listed on their Collector's Licence:

 

1. the person's name and address,

2. the type, make, calibre, model, action, magazine capacity and any serial number of the handgun,

3. the place where the handgun is generally kept,

4. the year of manufacture,

5. a letter documenting the obvious and significant commemorative, historic, thematic or investment value of the weapon (documentation must be provided to substantiate this claim)

6. identify your prolonged and genuine interest in the study, preservation or collection of modern collectable handguns.

 

Permanently inoperable Category H weapons:

Any handguns manufactured on or after 1 January 1901, which have been rendered permanently inoperable, are only required to be registered to a collector's licence. Licensees are not required to address points 5 and 6 above. (This figures - the process of rendering a weapon permanently inoperable is such that it is designed to destroy not just the weapon, but also any value it might have had.)

 

Now, here's a bit of bureaucratic leverage. The WLB standard letter (presumably sent to all of the muggins' who had registered the guns that they had been assured they did not have to hold a licence for must now be licenced) now attached  a list of all Category H handguns. From this list they were required to identify which one of the 4 classes of Collectors handguns their firearm(s) fell within and its year of manufacture.

 

This places an obligation upon weapons owners to classify their weapons into sub-categories (thereby allowing WLB at a later stage to allege that "the information supplied by the Defendant (that's you!) was incorrect and misleading in that it falsely included the weapon was a (insert class here) when the weapon was in fact a (insert the WLB preferred class here.)

 

Q: If WLB designates a weapon's class, why do they ask muggins to name the weapon and ask him to classify it?


A: So they can prosecute muggins later, when it becomes expedient.

 

 

 

 

 

 
 


 

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