Featuring permanent extracts of the best REDISCOVERING CORREGIDOR posts from our Society's Bulletin Board

 

FIELD NOTES

 

 

THE NORTH SIDE OF

MALINTA HILL

REDISCOVERING C-1 TUNNEL

FORT DRUM

FLOODED AREAS 

FORT DRUM

THE LESS VISITED  AREAS 

BATTERY HEARN

PART 1 | PART 2 | PART 3

 "E" CO ADVANCES TOWARDS BATTERY MONJA

MISCELLANEOUS TRAVELS ON CORREGIDOR - 1

VARIOUS SCENES - PART 1

THEN AND NOW

ENGINEER RAVINE

THEN AND NOW

BATTERY GEARY AIR RAID SHELTER PART 1

BATTERY GEARY VINTAGE IMAGES PART 2

BATTERY GEARY

 TODAY - PART 3

GOAL-POST RIDGE

BATTERY RJ-43

NAVY RADIO INTERCEPT TUNNEL ,  FOTS2/110423

TAILSIDE CEMETERIES, TOMBSTONES, FOTS2/110316

MALINTA HILL, COMPARISON 1977 SLIDES, FOTS2/090820

MALINTA HILL, GUN POSITION LOCATED,  FOTS2/110320

MIDDLESIDE BARRACKS, EXT & INTERIOR,  FOTS2/101210

NORTH OF KINDLEY FIELD, WALKING WEST,  FOTS2/101210

TAILSIDE, LT. LAWRENCE'S GUN POSITION, FOTS2/110205

OFFICER'S COUNTRY, GOLF CLUB & POOL, FOTS2/100329

ROCK POINT, SEARCHLIGHT NO. 2, FOTS2/091205

SEARCHLIGHT  NO. 2, DAMAGE BY LANDSLIDE  FOTS2/100415

GUN GROUP COMMAND POST, NO. 1, INTERIOR, FOTS2/090823

REVISITING BUNKER'S C-1 TUNNEL, FOTS/100427

DID BATTERY GRUBBS JUMP THEIR TRUNNIONS, TF/100120

INFANTRY TRENCH LINES ON TAILSIDE, FOTS2/090408

MALINTA GASOLINE STORAGE LATERALS FOTS2/090517

BATTERY WAY, PRE-WAR & SPECS, FOTS2/100523-1

BATTERY WAY, INTERIORS, PIT & STATIONS,  FOTS2/100523-2

JAPANESE TWIN 25mm AA GUN, IDENTIFICATION, FOTS2/100121

MARIVELES TUNNEL NO. 1, WELTEKE 110103

BATTERY SUNSET
 FOTS2/110514

THE U. S. NAVY  TUNNELS 

AT MARIVELES, BATAAN

 

 

 

 

ALL IMAGES ARE COPYRIGHT
BY THE RESPECTIVE AUTHORS


PAGES /LAYOUTS BY EXO

 

 

FIELD NOTES:

 

PLACE: CORREGIDOR DATE:

1 MAY 2012

LOCALITY: BATTERY HEARN
SUBJECT: BATTERY HEARN - Significant Landmarks
BY: JOHN MOFFITT
 

REF: FOTS2/120501-1

   
Part 1: Battery Hearn - Landmarks FOTS2/120501-1 You're here already!
Part 2: Battery Hearn - Underground FOTS2/120501-2 Read Field Note 2
Part 3: Battery Hearn - Magazine Interior FOTS2/120501-3 Read Field Note 3

 

“Battery Hearn consisted of one 12-inch Coastal Defense Gun mounted on a Barbette carriage and had a range of 29,000 yards.

Construction of the battery (formerly named Smith No. 2) commenced in 1918 and was completed in 1921 at a cost of $148,105. This made the battery the last large caliber seacoast artillery emplaced on Corregidor, when continuing ordnance development of the fortress was limited by the Washington Disarmament Treaty.

Built in the era prior to air-power, the large round light-colored concrete apron surrounding the gun made it a perfect bulls-eyes for Japanese observers on Bataan.

In 1937 Smith No. 2 was renamed in honor of Brigadier General Clint C. Hearn who had commanded the Harbor Defenses of Manila and Subic Bays in 1917.

The 1,000 lb armor piercing shell or the 670 lb High Explosive shell required a 270 lb bagged charge. Rate of fire was one round every 55 seconds, and the standard complement was one officer and 33 enlisted men, of whom 4 were stationed in the well beneath the carriage.

On 6 May, 1942, the gun and carriage were disabled by the crew, but not sufficiently to have the Japanese use American POW's place it back in service by replacing the mounted gun with the spare and stripping useable parts from Battery Smith to rebuild the carriage.

During the pre-invasion bombing of Corregidor in late January/early February 1945, a 1000 lb bomb exploded on the apron beside the gun, putting it permanently out of action”.

(Information from Corregidor.org)

 

____________________________________

 


Pre-war photo of Battery Hearn..
 


Battery Hearn was the location of this 1942 Japanese Banzai photo.
 



By the end of the war it looked very different as bombardment had taken a heavy toll.



The aerial reconnaissance photo shown below was taken February 16th, 1945 when Battery Hearn was still in Japanese hands.

Two days after the photo was taken, a significant night battle would occur in this area resulting in the awarding of the Congressional Medal of Honor. Accounts of the action are contained in the following articles:

 

THE NIGHT OF A THOUSAND HOURS

and

THE BEST WARRIOR I EVER KNEW


 



(312th BG photo via Pacific Wrecks courtesy of Tony F.)
 

To show you “Then and Now” views of the area, I have labelled significant landmarks so please refer back to this photo when looking at the rest of the report.




#1- The 12-inch gun with the underground magazines etc in the distance.
Sometime post war the barrel was raised a bit.






#1- The gun mounted on the concrete “bulls eye”.




#2- The 1000 lb bomb crater that put the gun permanently out of action.

 


#3- The underground part of Battery Hearn contains the Shell and Powder Rooms, Plotting Room, Power Room, Comms area and a rear entrance. I am not sure what two other rooms are for, perhaps offices of some sort.

 



#3- A closer view of the main entrance.

 


 

#3- Looking from the main entrance out towards the gun. We will go underground a little later.
 


#4- To the side of the road is a spare 12-inch barrel. This is the original gun barrel as the Japanese had the American POWs swap barrels during their work to get the gun back into service.

 


 

#4- Another view of the spare 12-inch barrel.


#4- GUN.12-IN M1895 NO.8
ORD DEPT USA
WATERVLIET ARSENAL 1898
118,630 LBS INSP. G.W.B.

 


 

#5- This rectangular structure is located across the road today. Inside it is a concrete tub (right side) and a concrete circular object resembling a large toilet (left side). My guess is that this was the battery latrine.

 

#5- Opposite end of the structure. There is a drain hole outside at the bottom of the wall.

 

#6- Here you can see two dark narrow rectangles in the aerial photo. These are tunnel entrances. One is quite narrow and has a lot of rebar sticking out so I did not go inside it. This one probably goes out under the gun. The other one can be entered easily and goes inside to the Plotting Room.

 

#6- This tunnel goes to the Plotting Room.

 

#7- There is a concrete set of steps up to the Battery Control Station. They are mostly covered in vegetation today but I cleared a few steps for a photo.

 

#8- The Battery Control Station was a small structure built on top of a platform over an airshaft. At the rear are a set of steps up to the platform. A rectangular piece of concrete with large metal bolts would have held some sort of range or direction finding equipment. It is rare to see such an exposed Control Station, not much is left of it.

 

#8- Rear view showing the concrete steps.

 

#8 - Damaged triangular pedestal.

 

#9- Concrete cover over one of the air ventilation shafts. The air vents are slanted.

#9- Side view of this air vent.

 

#10- End view of the largest air vent as you come up on top of the hill. This vent is above the Power Room and still has metal diesel exhaust pipes sticking out through the roof. A metal rung ladder down the vent also allows for access to the room or an emergency escape up if necessary.
 

#10- Side view of this air vent

 

#10- Looking across the air vent you can see part of the diesel exhaust pipes.
 

#10- In the opposite direction you can see the metal ladder.
 

#10- It is a long way down.

 

#11- The final air vent in the aerial photo is a bit further on the other side of a big crater.

 

#12- In the aerial photo you see the road disappear behind the hillside. Actually this was a trolley line that went into the rear entrance of Battery Hearn for the transport of heavy shells etc. A short ways inside this entrance, a bomb has collapsed the tunnel. At the point of impact, sunlight can be seen coming down a hole from the crater up above. This photo shows the rear entrance with the roof caved in.
 

#12- Under the collapsed roof, you cannot go far before it is a dead end.

 

#12- Up the hillside above the Rear Entrance is a crater from the bomb that collapsed the tunnel under it. Here I am standing on the edge of the crater and using some camera zoom to look at the broken tunnel roof. Straight ahead is rebar and a hole down into the tunnel below.

 

OK, enough fun out here. Let’s go underground.