This feature is a permanent extract of the best REDISCOVERING CORREGIDOR posts from our Bulletin Board

 

FIELD NOTES

 

 
MISCELLANEOUS TRAVELS
ON CORREGIDOR 1

MISCELLANEOUS TRAVELS
 ON CORREGIDOR - 1

VARIOUS SCENES - PART 1
THEN AND NOW

ENGINEER RAVINE

THEN AND NOW

BATTERY GEARY
AIR RAID SHELTER PART 1

BATTERY GEARY
VINTAGE IMAGES PART 2

BATTERY GEARY
 TODAY - PART 3

GOAL-POST RIDGE

BATTERY RJ-43

NAVY RADIO INTERCEPT TUNNEL ,  FOTS2/110423

TAILSIDE CEMETERIES, TOMBSTONES, FOTS2/110316

MALINTA HILL,
COMPARISON 1977 SLIDES, FOTS2/090820

MALINTA HILL, GUN POSITION LOCATED,  FOTS2/110320

MIDDLESIDE BARRACKS,
EXT & INTERIOR,  FOTS2/101210

NORTH OF KINDLEY FIELD,
WALKING WEST,  FOTS2/101210

TAILSIDE, LT. LAWRENCE'S GUN POSITION, FOTS2/110205

OFFICER'S COUNTRY,
GOLF CLUB & POOL, FOTS2/100329

ROCK POINT,
SEARCHLIGHT NO. 2, FOTS2/091205

SEARCHLIGHT  NO. 2, DAMAGE BY LANDSLIDE  FOTS2/100415

GUN GROUP COMMAND POST, NO. 1, INTERIOR, FOTS2/090823

REVISITING BUNKER'S C-1 TUNNEL, FOTS/100427

DID BATTERY GRUBBS JUMP THEIR TRUNNIONS, TF/100120

INFANTRY TRENCH LINES ON TAILSIDE, FOTS2/090408

MALINTA GASOLINE STORAGE LATERALS FOTS2/090517

BATTERY WAY, PRE-WAR & SPECS, FOTS2/100523-1

BATTERY WAY, INTERIORS, PIT & STATIONS,  FOTS2/100523-2

JAPANESE TWIN 25mm AA GUN, IDENTIFICATION, FOTS2/100121

MARIVELES TUNNEL No 1,
 WELTEKE 110103

BATTERY SUNSET
 FOTS2/110514

 

 

 

 

 

BACK TO PAGE ONE

FIELD NOTE:PAGE TWO

 

 

Many of these old photos will be quite familiar to people on these forums. I decided to include them anyway so as to consolidate them into one location. Since the tunnel is the focus of this report, in some photos it is the background and not the main subject that will be is of interest. If the source of a photo was known then it was credited.

 

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This is the earliest photo of Malinta Hill that I could find. Although it is undated I would estimate the photo was taken around 1900. The US built docks and coal basin do not exist yet. The view of the west side of Malinta Hill (at the left in the photo) does not show the quarry yet either. The future quarry will be the location at which the tunnel’s western entrance will be constructed. Caballo Island can be seen across Bottomside in the distance.

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Due to the quarry, this later photo clearly shows the scarred west side of Malinta Hill. The tunnel has not been started yet.

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The West entrance of Malinta Tunnel at the former quarry.

 

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Outside the West entrance during construction.

 

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This is no work activity to be seen in this undated photo. Mid 1930s might be a good guess as the West entrance is complete and civilians are still on the island.

 

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A trolley car at the West entrance.

 

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Interior tunnel photos are scarce. This photo shows ordinance stored in one of the laterals. (Photo courtesy LIFE magazine)

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This photo looks exactly like what you will see if you walk along either the north or south ventilation shafts of the Central System or parts of the QMC laterals. There appears to be an intersecting lateral on the left-hand side.(Photo courtesy LIFE magazine)

 

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Here is a war-time view of the West entrance taken from a 1941 video.

 

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If you ignore MacArthur out for a walk, this is a good photo of the defenses and camouflage erected at the East entrance.

 

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Generals MacArthur and Sutherland coming out of the East entrance.

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Scramble to get back inside the West entrance during Japanese shelling.

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1942 photo of men working in one of the laterals. Note the fluorescent lighting.

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Another 1942 Photo

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MacArthur and Sutherland in their HQ Lateral.

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A look at a Hospital lateral. They are empty now, still look like that, strips painted, other parts not painted.

 

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This video capture is from a Japanese newsreel recorded shortly after the 1942 surrender. Hospital bunks are stacked three high.

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I wonder if the more seriously injured men were those kept in the individual beds.

 

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A group of patients relax in the fresh air outside  the main Hospital entrance (i.e. the Malinta Tunnel North entrance).

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A 1942 photo of Mass being held inside one of the laterals.

 

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Here we see a video capture of the West entrance during wartime but before it was heavily damaged. Note the difference between this photo and the next one.

 

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This and the next two surrender photos (in May of 1942) are said to have been staged by the Japanese for their cameras to record. We are seeing the West entrance here.

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1942 surrender photo taken at the Malinta Tunnel East entrance.

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This photo was taken within a few seconds of the previous photo…same people.

 

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This 1945 aerial view of Malinta Hill shows its north (photo’s left side) and western slopes (photo’s mid to right side). Much of the south western part of the hill has been pulverized into rubble. Japanese guns on Bataan had a clear view of this part of Malinta Hill.

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February 16th 1945 view of the western part of Malinta Hill facing Bottomside. (photo courtesy EXO)

 

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Here we see more of Malinta Hill with the south side at photo centre. Pre-war concerns that the South Shore Road would be easily blocked by bombs or shellfire turned out to be valid. Quite a few trees remain on the top and eastern side of the hill.

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At wars end, the East entrance was still intact as we see in the following five photos. On March 2nd 1945, General MacArthur returned to Corregidor and his visit to the East entrance gives us a good view of what it looked like at that time.

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The West entrance was not so fortunate. It was destroyed to the point of nearly being sealed. Only part of the arch remains.

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A close-up view of the West entrance in 1945. 

 

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Even before the war ended on Luzon, the clean-up of Corregidor commenced. Here we see bulldozers working to remove rubble and open the road along the western side of Malinta Hill.

 

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Prison labor built the Malinta Tunnel and prison labor would clean it up. The difference now was that the labor would be Japanese POWs. This photo shows part of the Bottomside south POW camp. Notice that the base of Malinta Hill has already been leveled off by the bulldozers.

 

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This is the second Japanese POW camp located on Bottomside north. This area is now a mostly open field with some ‘sponsored’ trees planted in it. The field lies between Lorcha Dock and the present day Church. The 12-inch gun barrel seen near bottom right still lies at this same location today.

 

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The POWs with picks, shovels and wheelbarrows have not been working too long as the West entrance is just now being cleared.

 

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The West entrance is clear and work is being done inside the tunnel.

 

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Japanese POWs working inside Malinta Tunnel.

 

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Two POWs head back inside the tunnel.

 

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This is a great view of the west side of Malinta Hill during the post-war clean-up. The West entrance is straight ahead and the Gasoline Tunnel entrance is near bottom left. (photo courtesy rainbowtrout1)

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This crop of the previous photo shows a better view of the two tunnel entrances. POWs are dumping their wheelbarrow loads then heading back into the main tunnel.

 

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The clean-up seems to be complete in this photo. Malinta Tunnel West entrance basically looked the same until the 1975 to 1977 restoration got underway.

 

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Here is a closer look at the West entrance taken in 1946.

 

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The Malinta Tunnel West entrance in 1946. (photo courtesy of armyjunk)

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Looking out the same entrance. (photo courtesy of armyjunk)

 

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It does not take long for vegetation to envelop the island if left unchecked. This is the East entrance. (photo courtesy of armyjunk)

 

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This undated post-war photo of the East entrance shows 12-inch shells lined up along the road. I wonder if this was a continuation of the tunnel clean-up done in later years.

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1963 View of the West entrance.
(Video capture from "Fortress in the Sea".)

 

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1967 view of the West entrance. The top of the post-war church can be seen at the bottom. This is not the same church that is at the same location today.

 

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Close-up view of the West entrance taken in 1967.

 

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Warnings at the West entrance.

 

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1969 view of the West entrance. The Gasoline Tunnel entrance is hidden in the bushes to the left.

 

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This 1981 photo shows the reconstructed West entrance. The metal doors have not been added yet.

Part 3 will containcurrent photos of Malinta Tunnel.

 

 

This 1981 photo shows the reconstructed West entrance. The metal doors have not been added yet.

Part 3 contains current photos of Malinta Tunnel.